The Mighty Stonewall

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The Mighty Stonewall  

Historians have often debated as to whether the Confederates would have won the Battle of Gettysburg, which took place less then two months after General Jackson's death on 10 May 1863.  Had he lived and lead his army into battle on 1st, 2nd and 3rd of July 1863!   General Jackson, widely known as Stonewall, may very well have altering the course of the war, and of history!   Likely a Confederate victory at Gettysburg, for example, and later in the war itself, would have likely lead to General U.S. Grant surrendering to General Robert E. Lee.  The issue here is this; one man can indeed make a difference!
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.......Shoulders of Giants
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We could have pursued no other course without dishonor. And sad as the results have been, if it had all to be done again, we should be compelled to act in precisely the same manner." --- General Robert E. Lee.
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                                                    Are there giants in the making today?
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The question arose as to why the Old South and the Confederacy left behind so many stories and legends, leaving so long a shadow across the land?  My reply in one short quick sentence must be; "We stand on the shoulders of giants, and giants cast a larger shadow."  Just as a giant redwood tree casts a larger shadow than a maple tree.  How did the leaders, heroes and heroines of the Southland grow so tall and strong, above those of other men and women?
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Let us take a look; Generals Robert E. Lee, Thomas J. 'Stonewall' Jackson and President Jefferson Davis exemplifies so many others which could be mentioned from every State in the Confederacy.  General Robert E. Lee could hold and inspire the armies under his command in the face of severe shortages of food, clothing, medical supplies and munitions.  General Stonewall Jackson is is known to have been the greatest strategist and military tactician history has every produced. He faced five to one odds and still was able to produce victory after victory.
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Then there was President Jefferson Davis who kept a nation together in the darkest of hours, and against impossible odds.  If the Confederacy had won this the most bloody and devastating War for Confederate Independence, history would have recorded him as the father of his country. These three men alone would have required, in an independent Confederacy, a monument so huge it would have dwarfed the Stone Mountain Monument in Georgia. The issue for us today is not that they lost the war, but by some miracle, they lasted four devastating years against such overwhelming firepower and numbers.
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Had the Confederacy won that terrible war, Monument Row in Richmond Virginia would have become the center of the most spectacular patriotic parades ever witnessed.  Long gray columns would have stretched seemingly into the horizons, in the grandest pass and review parades of all time.  Yet why we should ask, have we no such inspiring and dynamic leaders today?   Well, simply because they have not as yet stepped forward and assumed their rightful leadership role.
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Because we having stood on the shoulders of giants assume our forefathers were of colossal size, thus we could never hope to match their achievements.  In truth while they were indeed giants it was not due to their physical size or attributes, but because having acquired the noblest principles and highest sense of honor, they dared to stand their ground upon the rightness of our just cause.  What did these and other noble Confederate leaders, heroes and heroines have in common, that they should achieve such great feats of bravery and daring?
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How could they be so different from each other, while at the same time so similar?  What was that 'certain something' which cause them to possess such charisma and commanding presence?  How is it that these men could cast such a long shadow across the pages of history?   It was none other then their belief and faith in the Almighty God, the Holy Scripture and prayer, in Christ Jesus our Lord and Savior. Howbeit that which made them what they were has now been banned from our public schools, as unfit material for the instruction of our children.
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The redwood tree previously alluded to when planted in fertile soil, when given water and adequate warm sunlight grows deep roots and the tree becomes tall and strong. It is the proud history, heritage, and culture of our people, when nurtured in divine soil and watered by His spirit, in the light of truth.  The day will therefore come when we will provide a new crop of dynamic leaders, heroes and heroines, which our cause so sorely needs in order to achieve independence.
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We find that same seed will be available to us today in our children and young adults, if indeed planted in the same soil, nurtured and watered by that same divine presence, it will produce those same noble results, whereby the Confederacy will rise again; standing tall and strong among the peoples and nations of the earth.
  Is it not feasible that our Lord Jesus Christ, having called forth Lazarus from the tomb, he could most assuredly in like manner rise up the Confederate States of America from the graveyard of history?
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.                                                              General Thomas J.
               {Stonewall} Jackson

                                     "Quotes from "The Mighty Stonewall"
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"Without God's blessing I look for no success, and for every success my prayer is, that all the glory may be given unto Him to whom it is properly due. If people would but give all the glory to God and regard his creatures as but unworthy instruments my heart would rejoice. Alas too frequently the praise is bestowed upon the creature."
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"Duty is ours; consequences are God's."
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"Always mystify, mislead and surprise the enemy if possible."
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"Captain, my religious belief teaches me to feel as safe in battle as in bed. God has fixed the time for my death.  I do not concern myself about that, but to be always ready, no matter when it may overtake me.  That is the way all men should live, and then all would be equally brave."
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"I am more afraid of alcohol than of all the bullets of the enemy."
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"The patriot volunteer, fighting for country and his rights, makes the most reliable soldier on earth."
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By General Thomas J. {Stonewall} Jackson
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Stonewall Jackson
Biographical Information
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Stonewall Jackson, real name THOMAS JONATHAN JACKSON (1824-63), Confederate soldier, considered by military authorities an outstanding leader, a skilled tactician, and one of the ablest Confederate commanders. Jackson was born on Jan. 21, 1824, in Clarksburg, Va. (now in W.Va.), and was educated at the U.S. Military Academy. Following his graduation (1846) from West Point he participated in the Mexican War until 1848. He became an instructor at the Virginia Military Institute (VMI) in 1851, and the next year he resigned from the army.
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1824 January 21
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Thomas Jonathan Jackson was born at Clarksburg, [Western] Virginia.Parents: Jonathan Jackson (1790-1826) an attorney, and Julia Beckwith Neale (1798-1831). They were married in September 1817 and had four children: Elizabeth (1819-1826); Warren (1821-1841); Thomas (1824-1863), and Laura Ann (1826-1911).
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1826 March
Jackson's sister Elizabeth (age 6) and his father died of typhoid fever. Julia Jackson gave birth to Laura the day after her husband died. Widowed at age 28, Julia was left with extensive debts and the family was impoverished.
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1830-1841
Julia Jackson remarried. Her new husband, Blake Woodson, disliked his stepchildren and was financially unstable. A short time after the marriage, Thomas and Laura were sent to live with Jackson relatives in Jackson's Mill WVA; Warren was sent to Neale relatives. Julia Jackson died, as a result of childbirth complications, on Dec. 4, 1831. She left behind the three Jackson siblings and a newborn son (Thomas's half brother), William Wirt Woodson (1831-1875). Jackson and Laura spent the remaining years of childhood with their paternal uncles. Jackson's brother, Warren, died of tuberculosis in 1841.
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1842 June-1846 June
Jackson attended the United States Military Academy at West Point. Jackson was not the first choice for his congressional district's appointment, but the top applicant withdrew from the academy after only one day. Jackson graduated in June 1846, standing 17th out of 59 graduates. Jackson began his U.S. Army career as a 2nd Lt., First Artillery Regiment. In 1844, Jackson's beloved sister, Laura, married Jonathan Arnold.
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1846-1851
United States Army officer. Served in the Mexican War, 1846-1848; stationed at Carlisle Barracks, PA; Ft. Hamilton, NY; Ft. Meade, FL.
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1851-1861 April
In the spring of 1851 Jackson was offered and accepted the appointment to teach at the Virginia Military Institute in Lexington, Virginia; he resigned from the army.
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Reported for duty at VMI on August 13, 1851. He taught natural and experimental philosophy (related to modern day physics and including physics, astronomy, acoustics, optics, and other scientific courses). On August 4, 1853, Jackson married Elinor Junkin (1825-1854), daughter of Dr. George Junkin (President of Washington College) and Julia Miller Junkin.
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Elinor (Ellie) died in childbirth on October 22, 1854. Their child, a son, was stillborn.
During the summer of 1856 Jackson toured Europe, visiting Belgium, France, Germany, Switzerland, England and Scotland.
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On July 16, 1857, Jackson married for the second time. His wife was Mary Anna Morrison (1831-1915), daughter of Robert Hall Morrison and Mary Graham Morrison. Mary Anna's family resided in North Carolina; her father was the retired President of Davidson College. 
Mary Anna gave birth to a daughter, Mary Graham, on April 30, 1858; the baby died less than a month later, on May 25.
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In November 1859, Jackson was one of the VMI officers who accompanied a contingent of VMI cadets to Harper's Ferry, where they stood guard at the execution of abolitionist John Brown.
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1861-1863
April 21, 1861 - the VMI Corps of Cadets was ordered to Richmond to serve as drillmasters for new army recruits. Jackson was placed in command of the cadets.http://www.randomhouse.com/features/godsgenerals/thomaspic.html
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April 27, 1861 - Gov. John Letcher ordered Col. Jackson to take command at Harper's Ferry, where he organized the troops that would soon comprise the famous "Stonewall Brigade" (2nd, 4th, 5th, 27th and 33rd Virginia Infantry Regiments; Rockbridge Artillery; all were from the Shenandoah Valley region of Virginia).
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July 1861 - Promoted to Brigadier General. Battle of 1st Manassas, where he acquired the legendary nickname Stonewall. "Look, there stands Jackson like a stone wall."
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                    First Battle of Manassas
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The first battle of Manassas was the first major engagement of the Civil War. On July 16, 1861, the Union army under Gen. Irvin McDowell began to move on the Confederate force under Gen. P. G. T. Beauregard at Manassas Junction, Va. Gen. Robert Patterson's force at nearby Martinsburg was to prevent the Confederate army under Gen. Joseph E. Johnston at Winchester from uniting with Beauregard but failed, and by July 20 part of Johnston's army had reached Manassas. On July 21, McDowell, turning Beauregard's left, attacked the Confederates near the stone bridge over Bull Run and drove them back to the Henry House Hill. There Confederate resistance, with Gen. Thomas J. Jackson standing like a "stone wall," checked the Union advance, and the arrival of Gen. E. Kirby Smith's brigade turned the tide against the Union forces. The unseasoned Union volunteers retreated, fleeing along roads jammed by panicked civilians who had turned out in their Sunday finery to watch the battle. The retreat became a rout as the soldiers made for the defenses of Washington, but the equally inexperienced Confederates were in no condition to make an effective pursuit. The South rejoiced at the result, while the North was spurred to greater efforts to win the war 
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October 1861 - Promoted to Major General. Placed in command of the Valley of Virginia (Shenandoah Valley)
1862 May & June - Jackson's brilliant Shenandoah Valley Campaign; victories at Front Royal, Winchester, Cross Keys and Port Republic. Following the successful campaign, Jackson was ordered to join Gen. Lee in the Peninsula (Eastern Virginia). Shenandoah Valley Campaign The Yankee McClellan is moving on our capital city. He plans an amphibious operation aimed at capturing Yorktown and moving north up the James River to Richmond.
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Our beloved Confederate city WILL NOT fall, and I shall see to it. General Lee has charged my command with a diversion strategy. CSA forces will attack THEIR capital city and put them ol' Blue Bellies on the defensive. Area surrounding the Yankee capital of Washington, D.C. is known as the Shenandoah Valley. We have used every hill, gorge, mountain and creek to execute our plan. We have engaged Union forces at every opportunity. Our 16,000 troops have occupied 50,000 Yankees for the last 12 weeks. We have prevented reinforcements from assisting McClellan and have saved the Confederacy. Yet, a greater challenge is ahead....
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1862 June 15-July 1 - Seven Days Battles. Jackson displayed ineffective leadership, which stood in stark, contrast to the brilliance of the Shenandoah Valley campaign; the reasons for this uncharacteristic military failure is still debated among Jackson scholars. Returned to the Valley. 1862 June-September. Battles of Cedar Mountain, Clark's Mt. 2nd Manassas (July 21), General Lee has given me the honor of commanding part of the most powerful force in opposition to the Union, the Confederate Army of Northern Virginia. Cedar Mountain was our most recent battle.
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We gave them Blue Bellies a fearin' that day as CSA forces drove the Yankee Pope back towards Manassas Junction. General Lee soon joined us and then ordered my Army to attack Yankee Pope. Today, we out marched Pope to Manassas and destroyed their supply depot. We then took position near the old Bull Run Battlefield and while Pope attacked, General Lee ordered my friend Longstreet to attack the Yankee left flank. We smashed them Yankees back across the Potomac. The Confederacy was free of Yankee invaders, this day.
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Antietam (September 17). Antietam General Lee's invasion of Maryland went well at first. When we got to the Maryland city of Fredrick - Lee saw fit to split CSA forces. Lee ordered my Army to secure Harper's Ferry (13,15,13) to open a line of retreat to the Shenandoah Valley. However, a spy among us had other plans. Turns out this spy, this dirty traitor, gave a copy of my orders from General Lee to the Yankee McClellan. The Yankees knew our moves and massed at Sharpsburg, directly infront of Lee along Antietam Creek. My Army joined General Lee this day and the battle began. The battle was bloody, in fact - Antietam Creek ran RED with soldiers' blood.
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We were a fearful we were gonna get whooped until A.P. Hill showed. We were happy to see our friend Hill but because we were outnumbered, we had to retreat across the Potomac into Virginia. We felt betrayed, not beat and we shall all- MEET AGAIN! 1862 October - Lee reorganized his army into two corps.
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Jackson was promoted to Lt. General and given command of the new Second Corps. Jackson was now in charge of half of Lee's Army of Northern Virginia. 1862 November - Jackson's daughter, Julia Laura, was born.  1862 December 13 - Battle of Fredericksburg 1862 December-1863 March - In quarters at Moss Neck, 10 miles south of Fredericksburg. The estate was owned by the Corbin family, who offered their home as winter headquarters. 1863 April - in camp at Hamilton's Crossing 1863 May 1 - Battle of Chancellorsville begins. Chancellorsville: My Fate CSA forces are currently entrenched east of Chancellorsville and south of the Maryland city of Fredericksburg.
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The Yankee Hooker recently took command from Burnside and was just awantin' a good fight. He sent part of his Yankee force to Fredericksburg to meet CSA General Jubal Early and the remaining Yankee force was sent to engage us Rebels' at a city called Chancellorsville. Fighting was intense, as bloody as Antietam - and we finally disengaged hostilities at nightfall. General Lee ordered my Army of 30,000 men to flank the southern Union force. We began the long march after midnite and in the early morning, we reached our objective. The Union Army attacked our forces, but to no gain.
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We were proud... My Army moved west, then north. We came upon a forest called "The Wilderness" and soon my troops were in the rear of the Yankee Army. We turned east and attacked, but the Yankees turned tail and ran to the city of Chancellorsville to hide. The Yankees held the city, but CSA forces needed military intellegence. Since my command was to address this problem, I scouted enemy positions and was to report same to my superiors. During the nite, I rode ahead of our combat forces and upon my return - was shot mistakenly by my OWN sentry!! I fell mortally wounded, eight days laters. Long live our cause and long live the Confederate States of America....
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1863 May 2, 9:00 p.m. - While reconnoitering with members of his staff, Jackson was accidentally fired upon by his own troops. The 18th North Carolina Infantry Regiment was responsible for the "friendly fire" incident. Jackson was struck by three .57 caliber bullets. He was taken to a field hospital near the battlefield, where his left arm was amputated. 1863 May 4 - Jackson was moved to a field hospital at the Chandler Home near Guiney's Station. 1863 May 10 - Jackson died at 3:15 p.m. His last words were "Let us cross over the river and rest under the shade of the trees."
1863 May 15. Jackson's funeral took place in Lexington, Virginia, the town that was Jackson's home during his years as Professor at VMI.
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                                                 First Battle of Manassas
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The first battle of Manassas was the first major engagement of the Civil War. On July 16, 1861, the Union army under Gen. Irvin McDowell began to move on the Confederate force under Gen. P. G. T. Beauregard at Manassas Junction, Va. Gen. Robert Patterson's force at nearby Martinsburg was to prevent the Confederate army under Gen. Joseph E. Johnston at Winchester from uniting with Beauregard but failed, and by July 20 part of Johnston's army had reached Manassas. On July 21, McDowell, turning Beauregard's left, attacked the Confederates near the stone bridge over Bull Run and drove them back to the Henry House Hill.
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There Confederate resistance, with Gen. Thomas J. Jackson standing like a "stone wall," checked the Union advance, and the arrival of Gen. E. Kirby Smith's brigade turned the tide against the Union forces. The unseasoned Union volunteers retreated, fleeing along roads jammed by panicked civilians who had turned out in their Sunday finery to watch the battle. The retreat became a rout as the soldiers made for the defenses of Washington, but the equally inexperienced Confederates were in no condition to make an effective pursuit. The South rejoiced at the result, while the North was spurred to greater efforts to win the war.
.
October 1861 - Promoted to Major General. Placed in command of the Valley of Virginia (Shenandoah Valley) 1862 May & June - Jackson's brilliant Shenandoah Valley Campaign; victories at Front Royal, Winchester, Cross Keys and Port Republic. Following the successful campaign, Jackson was ordered to join Gen. Lee in the Peninsula (Eastern Virginia). Shenandoah Valley Campaign The Yankee McClellan is moving on our capital city. He plans an amphibious operation aimed at capturing Yorktown and moving north up the James River to Richmond. Our beloved Confederate city WILL NOT fall, and I shall see to it.
.
General Lee has charged my command with a diversion strategy. CSA forces will attack THEIR capital city and put them ol' Blue Bellies on the defensive. Area surrounding the Yankee capital of Washington, D.C. is known as the Shenandoah Valley. We have used every hill, gorge, mountain and creek to execute our plan. We have engaged Union forces at every opportunity. Our 16,000 troops have occupied 50,000 Yankees for the last 12 weeks. We have prevented reinforcements from assisting McClellan and have saved the Confederacy. Yet, a greater challenge is ahead....
.
1862 June 15-July 1 - Seven Days Battles. Jackson displayed ineffective leadership, which stood in stark, contrast to the brilliance of the Shenandoah Valley campaign; the reasons for this uncharacteristic military failure is still debated among Jackson scholars. Returned to the Valley. 1862 June-September. Battles of Cedar Mountain, Clark's Mt. 2nd Manassas (July 21), General Lee has given me the honor of commanding part of the most powerful force in opposition to the Union, the Confederate Army of Northern Virginia. Cedar Mountain was our most recent battle.
.
We gave them Blue Bellies a fearin' that day as CSA forces drove the Yankee Pope back towards Manassas Junction. General Lee soon joined us and then ordered my Army to attack Yankee Pope. Today, we out marched Pope to Manassas and destroyed their supply depot. We then took position near the old Bull Run Battlefield and while Pope attacked, General Lee ordered my friend Longstreet to attack the Yankee left flank. We smashed them Yankees back across the Potomac. The Confederacy was free of Yankee invaders, this day.
.
Antietam (September 17). Antietam General Lee's invasion of Maryland went well at first. When we got to the Maryland city of Fredrick - Lee saw fit to split CSA forces. Lee ordered my Army to secure Harper's Ferry (13,15,13) to open a line of retreat to the Shenandoah Valley. However, a spy among us had other plans. Turns out this spy, this dirty traitor, gave a copy of my orders from General Lee to the Yankee McClellan. The Yankees knew our moves and massed at Sharpsburg, directly infront of Lee along Antietam Creek. My Army joined General Lee this day and the battle began. The battle was bloody, in fact - Antietam Creek ran RED with soldiers' blood.
.
We were a fearful we were gonna get whooped until A.P. Hill showed. We were happy to see our friend Hill but because we were outnumbered, we had to retreat across the Potomac into Virginia. We felt betrayed, not beat and we shall all - MEET AGAIN! 1862 October - Lee reorganized his army into two corps. Jackson was promoted to Lt. General and given command of the new Second Corps. Jackson was now in charge of half of Lee's Army of Northern Virginia. 1862 November - Jackson's daughter, Julia Laura, was born. 1862 December 13 - Battle of Fredericksburg 1862 December-1863 March - In quarters at Moss Neck, 10 miles south of Fredericksburg.
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The estate was owned by the Corbin family, who offered their home as winter headquarters.
1863 April - in camp at Hamilton's Crossing 1863 May 1 - Battle of Chancellorsville begins. Chancellorsville: My Fate CSA forces are currently entrenched east of Chancellorsville and south of the Maryland city of Fredericksburg. The Yankee Hooker recently took command from Burnside and was just awantin' a good fight. He sent part of his Yankee force to Fredericksburg to meet CSA General Jubal Early and the remaining Yankee force was sent to engage us Rebels' at a city called Chancellorsville.
.
Fighting was intense, as bloody as Antietam - and we finally disengaged hostilities at nightfall. General Lee ordered my Army of 30,000 men to flank the southern Union force. We began the long march after midnite and in the early morning, we reached our objective. The Union Army attacked our forces, but to no gain. We were proud... My Army moved west, then north. We came upon a forest called "The Wilderness" and soon my troops were in the rear of the Yankee Army. We turned east and attacked, but the Yankees turned tail and ran to the city of Chancellorsville to hide.
.
The Yankees held the city, but CSA forces needed military intellegence. Since my command was to address this problem, I scouted enemy positions and was to report same to my superiors. During the nite, I rode ahead of our combat forces and upon my return - was shot mistakenly by my OWN sentry!! I fell mortally wounded, eight days laters. Long live our cause and long live the Confederate States of America....
1863 May 2, 9:00 p.m. - While reconnoitering with members of his staff, Jackson was accidentally fired upon by his own troops.
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The 18th North Carolina Infantry Regiment was responsible for the "friendly fire" incident. Jackson was struck by three .57 caliber bullets. He was taken to a field hospital near the battlefield, where his left arm was amputated.
1863 May 4 - Jackson was moved to a field hospital at the Chandler Home near Guiney's Station. 1863 May 10 - Jackson died at 3:15 p.m. His last words were "Let us cross over the river and rest under the shade of the trees."  1863 May 15. Jackson's funeral took place in Lexington, Virginia, the town that was Jackson's home during his years as Professor at VMI.
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"Let us cross over the river and rest under the shade of the trees."  In a small outbuilding on the Chandler plantation near Guiney's Station, just south of Fredericksburg Virginia, our beloved General Thomas J. 'Stonewall' Jackson died.  Pneumonia had set in after the amputation of his arm from the wounds he received on May 2nd in the Battle of Chancellorsville. 

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